By HonestDiscussioner

Religion, Philosophy, Politics, and anything else I'd like to talk about

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Thursday, July 12, 2012

How the Native Americans Disprove Christianity

Since this is my first post, it seems right that the subject matter have something to do with a beginning of sorts. Luckily for me, I had just such a topic in mind.

It was almost four years ago that I uploaded my first Youtube video, a three part series (yes, three parts. Remember when Youtube had that pesky 10 minute time limit?) made from my initial writings on religion that I had dubbed "Philosophical Proofs: Paradox of Religion". I covered many topics, but there was one point that I made that I felt was pretty much irrefutable, a bit of our human history that all should look at and say "this makes no sense under Christianity". According to the Bible, God and/or Jesus wants people to know Christianity, wants people to be aware of the supposed truth that the religion preaches.  Reality would seem to contradict this sentiment.

Consider the fact that for well over an entire millennium, Christianity (along with many other religions) was only found in the eastern hemisphere of our planet. For hundreds of generations, those that lived in North and South America had zero contact with Christianity. They had never heard of Jesus, Abraham, or Moses. Never read Genesis, Psalms, or the Gospels. They had relationships with "spirits", but mostly no actual deity like the classical monotheistic or pagan traditions. Basically they were as far away from Christianity as one could expect.

How can anyone reconcile this fact with 1 Timothy 2:3-4: "For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth."

If the Christian god exists, it should not be the case that half the world would remain ignorant of his word for so long. He supposedly downloaded the gospels into Paul's brain, and not only did he avoid doing that in the Western hemisphere, but if the Christian god exists he let his loyal followers remain ignorant of the millions of people living on the other side of the world, let them believe that there was an edge they would fall off from if they tried to cross it. Humans had the nautical technology to cross the Atlantic long before Columbus, a mere whisper in someone's ear could have brought the gospels centuries earlier.

I bring this to you now because it was one of the first public points I made against religion, and it is the one that I have received the least amount of response from in these past four years. The best anyone has been able to do is to appeal to a sort of Universalism or in some way argue "God is fair, they aren't going to hell since they didn't know any better". This may help their case, but it misses the main point. It isn't just about who does and does not go to hell, even if there is no such thing as hell, it is about whether we see any evidence of God informing people outside of the reach of Christian missionaries of his one true religion. To my knowledge, we have no instances of this happening.

To further illustrate my point, an analogy: A man with infinite resources and connections writes a book and declares "I want every person in the world to read this book!" but he only prints it in South Sudan and then only in Latin. Would you believe that individual is intelligent, rational, and sincere about his declaration? Unless you can answer "yes" to that question, then you cannot believe that God wants all humans to know his word.

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